why abstinence is the best method.

OOPS Proof Birth Control

If you’ve decided that now’s not the time for sex, that’s totally cool! You can still get close with your partner by putting intimacy at the top of your list. Intimacy involves trust, good communication and respect, which are important things to have in a relationship.

Even if you’ve been sexually active in the past, it’s normal to set your own boundaries and hold off on sex if the timing or relationship doesn’t feel right to you.

birth control

why abstinence is the best method.

OOPS Proof Birth Control

If you’ve decided that now’s not the time for sex, that’s totally cool! You can still get close with your partner by putting intimacy at the top of your list. Intimacy involves trust, good communication and respect, which are important things to have in a relationship.

Even if you’ve been sexually active in the past, it’s normal to set your own boundaries and hold off on sex if the timing or relationship doesn’t feel right to you.

birth control

birth control options

ABSTINENCE

This is the safest and most effective method!

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Implants and IUDs

These are hassle-free, highly effective and reversible ways to prevent pregnancy for young women. A health care provider can insert an implant or IUD in one short, routine office visit. After that, there’s no maintenance until you’re ready to have it removed or time runs out.

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The Pill

The pill is very popular, but don’t be afraid to explore other methods like the IUD or Implant—especially if you have trouble getting the pill or remembering to take it. The pill can help regulate periods, control acne, help with endometriosis and make periods less painful.

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The Shot

The shot is just what it sounds like—a shot that keeps you from getting pregnant. Perfect if you don't want to think about your birth control every day. You have to go for a shot every three months.

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The Patch

The patch is a thin, beige piece of plastic that looks like a square Band-Aid. If you start the patch within the first 5 days of your period, you're protected from pregnancy right away. If you start later, you'll have to wait 7 days before you're protected, and you'll need to use a backup method.

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MALE CONDOM

Male condoms are one of the most popular forms of birth control out there. They slip over a guy’s penis to prevent pregnancy and lower the risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) by keeping sperm inside the condom and out of the girl’s vagina.

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FEMALE CONDOM

A female condom—aka, an internal or receptive condom—is a pouch that’s inserted into the vagina. It’s not the prettiest thing in the world, but it does give women more control than a male condom and can help protect them from STIs

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CERVICAL CAP

To get a cervical cap, women must get fitted by a doc or at a clinic, then go pick it up with a prescription. It is immediately effective and it doesn’t involve hormones. The cervical cap must be worn every time the woman has sex.

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THE RING

The ring is a small, bendable ring that is inserted into a girl’s vagina. Women must visit a health care provider or clinic for the initial prescription. You can actually take the Ring out during sex if you don't want your partner to feel it - but don't forget to put it back in right away!

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EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION

Emergency contraception (EC) can stop a pregnancy before it starts. The ParaGard IUD is extremely effective as EC, and EC pills are somewhat effective. They’re good, but not as good as many other birth control methods you can use before or during sex.

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The Sponge

The sponge is a round piece of white plastic foam with a little dimple on one side and a nylon loop across the top that you insert it way up in your vagina before you have sex.

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DIAPHRAGM

A diaphragm is a shallow, dome-shaped cup made of latex or silicone. You insert the diaphragm into your vagina, and it covers your cervix to keep sperm out of your uterus. For a diaphragm to work effectively, use it with spermicide.

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Spermicide

Spermicide describes a bunch of different creams, films, foams, gels and suppositories that contain chemicals that stop sperm from moving. With perfect use, spermicides are 82% effective, but with normal use, they’re only 72% effective.

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Read more about different birth control methods available.

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want to learn more about iuds + implants

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more questions about birth control?

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